A House for All Children

Chapter 4 - Accessibility in and Around the Home

"Getting into and out of the house safely is an important issue for children with disabilities. But it is only the beginning step in creating an accessible home. Getting around the house safely, and as independently as possible, is just as important. In this chapter we focus on strategies for achieving this, with a detailed look at doorways, hallways, stairs, bathrooms, kitchens, and the outdoors. We also discuss tactics for controlling access to danger zones, limiting damage from wheelchairs, and solving some toileting problems. We end the chapter with some guiding principles on general accessibility throughout the home." - Authors

Bathrooms

If you have a young child, now is the time to evaluate your existing bathroom very carefully. Ask yourself: Will this space work, or can it be adapted so it will work for us in the future? Here are some of the specific questions to explore.

  • Is the doorway wide enough for a manual or power wheelchair or other mobility device to pass through?
  • How does the approach to the bathroom work?
  • How large is the floor area in the bathroom?
  • Is there sufficient transfer space by the shower or tub?


Providing turning space outside the bathroom door.


Angling the door can improve the approach to the bathroom. The door should be 36" wide with a swing-clear or offset hinges - or install a pocket door.

 

Kitchens

The following features are helpful in the kitchen:

  • Rounded or bull-nose edging along the counters and appliances.
  • Pull-out drawers, shelves, cutting boards, and counters in cabinets for storage.
  • Refrigerators with special storage compartments that are accessible from the outside.
  • Pulls for wall cabinets placed as low as possible.
  • Accessible sinks and faucets.
  • Refrigerators with outside water and ice dispensers.
  • Easy-open pantries.
  • A refrigerator guard.


Easy-open pantries with frequently used items stored on the most accessible shelves.


Pull-out drawers, shelves, cutting boards, and counters in cabinets for storage that can be easily accessed from a wheelchair.
C-shape pulls, not knobs, on drawers and cabinet doors, which are easy to grasp and pull.

Home - Book Highlights - Video Highlights - Order Form - Contact Info

This website is optimized for use with a screen resolution of 800x600 and Version 5.0 or higher web browsers.

All Rights Reserved - No part of this website may be reprinted without permission from
CENTER FOR ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING SCIENCE RESEARCH
NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
CAMPBELL HALL ROOM 335
UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 07102-1982

Web Design by:

Visit Our Website-Let Us Come Up With A Creative Solution For You!